The K-cup story

Many years ago, John Sylvan had an idea: provide a hermetically-sealed, compact cartridge containing a filter and enough ground coffee to brew a single serving in a specially designed brewer. After the freshly brewed coffee was delivered, the remaining carcass would simply be discarded without fuss or muss. Sylvan’s brilliant idea came to him in the mid-80s. He did not begin working on the idea in earnest until the 90s. John and the company he formed had the forethought to apply for patents on his innovation.

Keurig, named after the Danish word for excellence, toiled through the 90s funded almost exclusively by investors perfecting the cartridge, which came to be known as …

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Kurt writes a bimonthly column for ColoradoBiz Magazine

Kurt writes a bimonthly column for ColoradoBiz Magazine

Hazy times for Colorado’s marijuana businesses

Many businesses are dealing with the impacts of Colorado’s foray into recreational marijuana. Often, this uncertainty is focused on how the new laws and regulations will be implemented. While compliance with the Colorado regulatory framework is often the first priority of companies associated with the marijuana industry, another important legal issue is lurking below the surface, and unfortunately how it is resolved remains to be seen. The issue concerns an area of intellectual property law that all businesses have – trademarks.

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Peter writes a bimonthly column for ColoradoBiz Magazine

Peter writes a bimonthly column for ColoradoBiz Magazine

Internet marketing and trademark trouble: Somebody else might be using your biz name

In the not so distant past, marketing and advertising a business was a particularly challenging and daunting task. Local businesses relied heavily on Yellow Pages advertising, radio and television. They had to decide how large a listing, under what categories to be listed, and/or how comprehensive a broadcast campaign they could afford.

The cost could be substantial and no matter how large the listing, the amount of information conveyed was relatively small. Depending on the product and services, the businesses might also have to print brochures to be handed out or mailed to prospective consumers. If a mistake were made, the businesses would have to wait an entire year to make corrections.

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Kurt writes a bimonthly column for ColoradoBiz Magazine

Kurt writes a  column for ColoradoBiz Magazine

The perils of third-party IP policy shifts

A client recently gave me a head’s up about some new developments in YouTube’s Content ID System that was causing an uproar in the gaming community and with others who monetize their YouTube videos.

The conflict stems from what appears to be over-aggressive actions on YouTube’s part to attempt to deal with copyright infringement on its service. While YouTube’s actions may not directly affect a lot of mainstream businesses, it can serve as a good lesson for those that use third-party providers to host and disseminate content for their business and how a change in policies by these third parties can radically affect one’s business.

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Peter writes a bimonthly column for ColoradoBiz Magazine

Peter writes a bimonthly column for ColoradoBiz Magazine

The murky law of fair use

Weird Al doing a Michael Jackson song parody?

In our practice, we deal not only with the enforcement of intellectual property rights, but we also do a fair amount of defense of accused infringers. One of the surest ways of getting into an intellectual property dispute (aside from illegally downloading movies using

BitTorrent) is to make reference to, mention or otherwise utilize someone else’s intellectual property.

While this may seem obvious, it can creep up in the business context in unexpected ways. Generally speaking, business will cite that they are allowed to do their activities under the doctrine of “Fair Use.” Additionally, it is important to note that there is a difference in running afoul of the law and being embroiled in a conflict with another business. While a company’s actions may be justified legally, it may still find itself in a dispute which can cost a lot of money, time and resources.

Peter writes a bimonthly column for ColoradoBiz Magazine

Peter writes a bimonthly column for ColoradoBiz Magazine

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A fool’s bargain: Part 2 – Think before you sue

(Editor’s note: This is the second of two parts. Read Part 1.)

In the first part of this article, I discussed what trademarks are, what they protect and what factors courts generally use to determine if a trademark has been infringed.  In this installment I will be discussing how courts have dealt with the rise of keyword advertising and the use of trademarks in keyword advertising.

Peter writes a bimonthly column for ColoradoBiz Magazine

Peter writes a bimonthly column for ColoradoBiz Magazine

In the early days of the keyword advertising cases, the courts struggled with some threshold concepts, such as whether bidding on someone else’s trademark was a use in commerce. Some courts said yes, and some said no. After many years, everyone seems to agree that even though the consumer never sees the keyword bidding process, that the act of bidding on another’s trademark as a keyword is a use in commerce.

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A fool’s bargain: Part 1 – Should you sue over keyword advertising?

 

One thing is guaranteed; the law will always lag technology. That’s just the way it is. However, eventually the law catches up and usually comes up with the right result.

Peter writes a bimonthly column for ColoradoBiz Magazine

Peter writes a bimonthly column for ColoradoBiz Magazine

 

Such is the case with paid search advertising such as Google Ad-words. In case you have been living under a rock for the past decade, paid search advertising is where a company purchases web-based advertising that is triggered by users typing certain keywords into a search engine.  When the user types in their query, the search engine will display the paid ads in addition to the organic search results. The ads generally contain a few lines of text and will have a link that directs you to the advertiser’s website.

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It’s not always best to follow the leader

Case in point: Twitter’s new IPA

A few months ago, I attended an intellectual property conference where the head IP counsel for Twitter discussed its new Innovator’s Patent Agreement, or IPA.

Peter writes a bimonthly column for ColoradoBiz Magazine

Peter writes a bimonthly column for ColoradoBiz Magazine

A few of the panel members hailing from academic institutions were drooling over the IPA as a revolutionary new path for companies to take with regard to their employees and intellectual property rights. As I was not familiar with Twitter’s recent announcement, my immediate gut reaction was that the only good IPA is one in a frosty mug that is full of golden, hoppy goodness. Upon delving into the Twitter IPA, I have come to the conclusion that my initial assessment was correct — well, at least for most of us out there.

Twitter claims that the development of the IPA came about as a result of the need to recruit the best and brightest software developers. Since these individuals grew up in a time that movies and music were expected to be freely available on the Internet, the new generation of developers do not like patents and want more control over how their software innovations are used.

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Can you keep a secret? Resist the urge to blab about that new gadget

Sometimes keeping quiet about a new product, service or venture can be difficult. While it may be difficult to fight the urge to tell everyone on the street all about your new innovative process, formulation or gadget, it is wise for a business to take a bit of time and see whether the new innovation is protectable under one of the theories of intellectual property law.

Peter writes a bimonthly column for ColoradoBiz Magazine

Peter writes a bimonthly column for ColoradoBiz Magazine

Some of the available protections such as trade secret require the business to take certain actions, or act in a certain way, and if not properly done, the protection under the law may be lost forever. In these cases we often discuss some of the more well-known intellectual property protections such as patents, copyrights and trademarks.

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Hey, that’s mine! The ins and outs of grey markets and the law

At some time or another, anyone who produces a product or commercializes a copyrightable work will inevitably run into the situation where you see your products being resold by someone that is not you or one of your direct distributors.

Oftentimes, this becomes an issue for a business because of the price at which the items are being sold (usually lower than the business would like) or possibly because of the bad reputation of the seller in question. Other times, it is a grey market situation where goods that were originally produced and sold in overseas markets make their way back to the United States.

The question my clients have is almost universally, “How do I stop this?” Generally speaking, the answer is that in the United States, it is either extremely difficult to stop it or you flat out cannot stop it at all, due to a theory of law called the Right of First Sale.

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